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     Native Americans

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Bundled Blessed & Headin West





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Camp At The Cougar's Den



“Some years ago, while riding horseback in the Bitterroot Range with a friend, we came upon this interesting maze of rocks and fallen timbers high up in the mountains,” says Terpning regarding the inspiration for Camp at Cougar’s Den.“Upon close examination we could detect the smell of a cougar in the small cave-like enclosure. The whole scene took on an even more primitive and wild nature, and I knew that this den could be the setting for a story. I realized a camp scene would be a logical choice, with Blackfoot raiders out to create some mischief and stopped for the night before traveling on.” Howard Terpning’s devotion and respect for his subject matter, extraordinary palette and brushstroke, and the ability to evoke emotion have made him the most lauded painter of Western art. Camp at Cougar’s Den was recipient of a pair of awards at the Masters of the American West Fine Art Exhibition and Sale at the Museum of the American West (formerly the Autry Museum of Western Heritage): The Thomas Moran Memorial Award for Painting for Exceptional Artistic Merit and The Patron’s Award for Work Most Popular with the Patrons of the Exhibition and Sale. Contact your Authorized Greenwich Workshop Dealer to secure your canvas of this award winning painting today.

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Camp In The Tetons





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Camp Sentry



“It is a cold Montana winter afternoon,” says artist Z.S. Liang, “and this Piegan war chief has ridden out alone from his encampment to assure the area is secure for his people.” The South Piegan, based in Montana for thousands of years, are part of the Blackfoot Confederacy.



Artist Z.S. Liang often recounts that his rural Chinese upbringing was centered on ancient and traditional lifestyles which made it easy for him to relate to the Native Americans. For example, no resources were wasted in his home, much like the Plains Indians who used every part of the buffalo their lives depended on. A long time US resident, Liang has made himself into a student of Native American life, both in his personal library, and his time in the field with tribes today. His devotion to historical details, and to the constant improvement of his skills, led him to horseback riding lessons so he could more accurately understand the movement and musculature of the animal that played such an important role in the life of the Plains Indian.



"Camp Sentry," a dramatic portrait of Native and horse in the winter sun of Montana, is a consummate example of Liang’s skilled composition. Patterns of light and dark are repeated from the sky, the mountains, and the light field of snow, to the rider’s coat and his mount. Note how the headdress just touches the mountain’s horizon, preparing the eye for the spear tip that breaks that line. We can practically feel the chill wind in the brushstrokes on the horse, its tail, and the winter grass. Offered in an edition of only 35, this outstanding and rare Liang is a work of fine art that will be treasured in any home.

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Canyon Trails





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Canyonlands





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Capture Of The Horse Bundle





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Captured From General Crook´S Com



In the early 1880s,Apache raiding parties were always looking for ammunition and military hardware for their never-ending fight against encroaching civilization. After years of being chased and harassed by the U.S. Cavalry, the number of Apache warriors had been greatly reduced and their only means of survival was by raiding and capturing goods from settlers, Sonorans and the military. In this instance, the raiders managed to capture a loaded pack horse and the Apache warrior riding the paint horse snatched a full pair of saddle bags which may also yield ammunition, food and other usable goods. General Crook, whom the Apaches called “Grey Wolf,”was twice sent to Arizona to subdue the Apache and to force them onto reservations. These periods of warfare and relative peace stretched from the early 1870s to 1886 when Geronimo finally surrendered.The dramatic action and composition in Howard Terpning’s Captured from General Crook’s Command conveys the Apache’s urgency and desperation.

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Cardinal Number III





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Ceremonial Lance





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Change Of Command



SmallWorks – Epic Story – Low Edition: Following the Civil War, the Sioux, along with their Cheyenne and Arapaho allies, struck at will against civilian and military targets all along the trails that led in and out of Fort Laramie. In 1865, the Powder River Expedition was sent to quell the violence but was routed in several engagements by superior forces that numbered as high as two thousand warriors.

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Chased By The Devil



Three Apaches race to stay ahead of a dust devil, the desert hot-weather whirlwind full of dust and debris.These ethereal pillars of air and dirt have meandered the baked earth since the oceans first receeded.The white man speaks of thermals and explains them in dry meteorological terms, but the Apache knew better. He knew that the devil was inside the whirlwind, and that if you were caught you would soon die. Howard Terpning created a strong feeling of motion to convey the sense of the Apaches galloping their horses as hard as they could, which is emphasized by this awe--inspiring composition.

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Cheyenne At The Disappearing Creek Called "White



“In the 19th century and before, in what is now western Kansas, there was an area called the ‘White Woman Basin,’” says artist and storyteller Howard Terpning. “It is more or less centered between the north and south borders of the state. In the early days there was a creek, which meandered into the basin and at some point disappeared into the round. This creek is still on the map.The basin had many pools and springs and was an important source of water for the Southern Cheyenne who ranged over Kansas and the surrounding country. Small parties of Cheyenne warriors would often stop with their horses for a welcome drink.”

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Cheyenne Dog Soldier





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Cheyenne Mother



A nation is not conquered Until the hearts of its women are on the ground. Then it is finished, No matter how brave its warriors Or how strong their weapons. — Cheyenne proverb Award-winning CA artist Howard Terpning captures the solemn pride—and tenderness—of a young Cheyenne mother. She poses in her everyday dress of doeskin, a cradleboard secured to her back by straps around her chest and shoulders. From her belt hangs a knife in an elaborately fringed and beaded sheath.

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Cheyenne Split Horn Headdress





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Chief Joseph Rides To Surrender





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Chores





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Cimarron





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Circling The Enemy



During the mid-nineteenth century, conflict with resident Native Americans intensified as settlers continued their westward expansion. This mixed party of Lakota and Northern Cheyenne warriors stands literally between the West and an approaching convoy of covered wagons. The skies are dark and threatening, emphasizing the imminent expansion and conquest of the Native Americans. They ride out bravely in the setting sun, aware that it may already be too late to preserve their land and their lives. “The physical strength of the horses and the daring of the men,” says Z.S. Liang, “combined with the pounding hooves and war cries, generate a sense of great energy and power in this mounted strike force!”

Those who are fortunate enough to see Z.S. Liang’s work in person are quick to compare him to the great masters of modern Western art, from Frank McCarthy to Howard Terpning. Within the last year alone, the market for both Liang’s originals and limited editions has erupted. Pueblo Street Market, 1920s, his last release from The Greenwich Workshop, was Sold Out at Publisher within thirty days. This is your chance to purchase a spectacular and dynamic work from one of the rising stars of Western art—don’t miss out!

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