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     Native Americans

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Cardinal Number III





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Ceremonial Lance





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Change Of Command



SmallWorks – Epic Story – Low Edition: Following the Civil War, the Sioux, along with their Cheyenne and Arapaho allies, struck at will against civilian and military targets all along the trails that led in and out of Fort Laramie. In 1865, the Powder River Expedition was sent to quell the violence but was routed in several engagements by superior forces that numbered as high as two thousand warriors.

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Chased By The Devil



Three Apaches race to stay ahead of a dust devil, the desert hot-weather whirlwind full of dust and debris.These ethereal pillars of air and dirt have meandered the baked earth since the oceans first receeded.The white man speaks of thermals and explains them in dry meteorological terms, but the Apache knew better. He knew that the devil was inside the whirlwind, and that if you were caught you would soon die. Howard Terpning created a strong feeling of motion to convey the sense of the Apaches galloping their horses as hard as they could, which is emphasized by this awe--inspiring composition.

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Cheyenne At The Disappearing Creek Called "White



“In the 19th century and before, in what is now western Kansas, there was an area called the ‘White Woman Basin,’” says artist and storyteller Howard Terpning. “It is more or less centered between the north and south borders of the state. In the early days there was a creek, which meandered into the basin and at some point disappeared into the round. This creek is still on the map.The basin had many pools and springs and was an important source of water for the Southern Cheyenne who ranged over Kansas and the surrounding country. Small parties of Cheyenne warriors would often stop with their horses for a welcome drink.”

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Cheyenne Dog Soldier





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Cheyenne Mother



A nation is not conquered Until the hearts of its women are on the ground. Then it is finished, No matter how brave its warriors Or how strong their weapons. — Cheyenne proverb Award-winning CA artist Howard Terpning captures the solemn pride—and tenderness—of a young Cheyenne mother. She poses in her everyday dress of doeskin, a cradleboard secured to her back by straps around her chest and shoulders. From her belt hangs a knife in an elaborately fringed and beaded sheath.

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Cheyenne Split Horn Headdress





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Chief Joseph Rides To Surrender





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Circling The Enemy



During the mid-nineteenth century, conflict with resident Native Americans intensified as settlers continued their westward expansion. This mixed party of Lakota and Northern Cheyenne warriors stands literally between the West and an approaching convoy of covered wagons. The skies are dark and threatening, emphasizing the imminent expansion and conquest of the Native Americans. They ride out bravely in the setting sun, aware that it may already be too late to preserve their land and their lives. “The physical strength of the horses and the daring of the men,” says Z.S. Liang, “combined with the pounding hooves and war cries, generate a sense of great energy and power in this mounted strike force!”

Those who are fortunate enough to see Z.S. Liang’s work in person are quick to compare him to the great masters of modern Western art, from Frank McCarthy to Howard Terpning. Within the last year alone, the market for both Liang’s originals and limited editions has erupted. Pueblo Street Market, 1920s, his last release from The Greenwich Workshop, was Sold Out at Publisher within thirty days. This is your chance to purchase a spectacular and dynamic work from one of the rising stars of Western art—don’t miss out!

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Cold Morning





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Color Of Sun





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Comanche Spoilers





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Coming 'Round The Bend





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Contemporary Sioux Indian



The distinctive portraits of James Bama have earned him the respect of art collectors and critics worldwide. The focus of Contemporary Sioux Indian is Oglala Sioux Wendy Irving, a modern-day Indian whose choker necklace, ribbon shirt and braids wrapped in otter skin indicate that he clings to the traditions of his people, yet finds himself caught between two worlds. To give the painting a contemporary flavor Bama placed him against a peeling wall that warns, "No Parking, Violators Towed Away," suggesting that the Indian does not fit in the white man´s affluent neighborhood." These are sophisticated young Indians, very aware of what is going on," says Bama." They are not about to sit back passively and endure injustices. They seem limited in what they can do other than become educated and find a niche in the white man´s world where their old ways have been accorded little or no place."

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Cool Evening



As the sun sets over the prairie, the stifling heat of the day gives way to a cooler, gentler breeze.The cows low quietly as they settle in for the evening and their guardian takes a minute to enjoy the fruits of a day’s hard work.This perfect moment is lovingly captured by artist Nelson Boren and beautifully reproduced on Hahnemühle German etching paper, deckled on all sides.

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Council Of Chiefs





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Council Regalia Personal Commission&Trade;



"The Plains Indian reveled in finery and wore the best he had for ceremonial occasions. When not doing more immediate chores, the women spent untold hours decorating their husbands’ clothing and accoutrements with trade beads and natural items such as bear claws, feathers, quills, pieces of bone, often dyed in bright colors. War bonnets worn by three of these Blackfeet elders were usually reserved for special events. Not often were they worn into combat, where they might be lost in the fury of the fight and perhaps give an enemy some magical power over the rightful owner. The buffalo horn headdress was fairly common and gave the wearer an eerie appearance as he went rushing against an enemy, shouting a war cry calculated to chill his opponent to the bone. In some tribes the man who carried the lance into battle was burdened with a special responsibility not to retreat. For that reason, many warriors shunned the lance as a weapon." – Howard Terpning



Few artists and their work are relevant for a decade. Howard Terpning has remained so for the 30 years we have published his Fine Art Editions. Since we first issued his limited editions in1980, Howard Terpning has set the bar in collecting Western art.



To commemorate this achievement, The Greenwich Workshop will release a series of Personal Commission Prints that reflect his publishing program with us over the last 30 years. As Personal Commissions, each release is guaranteed to be a Sold-Out Edition, as the edition size is set by the number of orders we receive in the Commission Period. By keeping the Commission Period short, we expect tight edition sizes.



In 1980 one of the first limited editions we issued with Howard was created from the mixed media original The Spectators. Of the over 100 editions we have produced since then, Council Regalia would represent only the sixth fine art edition of a Terpning mixed media work.



Council Regalia will be released as a Masterwork Giclee edition, printed on the highest quality Hahnemuhle German Etching fine art textured paper. Deckled edges surround the entire image area allowing for either a traditional or floating presentation of the framed image.



About Your Personal Commission Print:





1. What is a Personal Commission?



The Personal Commission was created by The Greenwich Workshop™, Inc. as a way to collect an individual work of an artist whose fine art prints often sell out and are difficult to find. You can “commission” your personal copy of a print during a set period. Delivery of completed prints begins shortly after the edition size is determined by the total number of orders received during the commission period.





2. Ordering a Personal Commission Print:



It’s simple! Prints may be ordered during the commission period July 2, 2010 through July 26, 2010. To place an order, contact your Greenwich Workshop authorized dealer for a a Personal Commission form. Each form must be accompanied by a deposit for each print ordered. All orders must be received by July 26, 2010.





3. When will prints be delivered?



Delivery will begin July 28, 2010 and will include confirmation of the final edition size.

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Coup Sticks And War Paint



These two Northern Plains warriors have applied their war paint and are ready for whatever trouble comes their way. To “count coup” on an enemy was a great war honor. It meant touching the enemy with any object in the warrior’s hand—a bow, a rifle or a special stick—usually adorned with at least one feather. It was called a coup stick and was carried for the express purpose of touching an enemy if he could get close enough. An accumulation of these war honors built a warrior’s reputation among his people, gave him great stature and gained the admiration of the people in his camp. His prowess as a strong warrior also made him more desirable to the young maidens who might be looking for a suitable mate.

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Cowboy Country Club





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