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     Cowboys

     Native Americans

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Cowboy Romance





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Cree Finery





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Crossing At The Ford



Howard Terpning’s respect for his subject matter evokes emotion both in his paintings and from those viewing them, have made him one of the most lauded painters of Western art. In his latest original, this “Storyteller of the Native American” has created a stunning vision of three Crow Indians as they begin to cross a river. “These three Crows are part of a war party in search of their enemy,” Howard says. “Knowing how to find the ford in a river is a big advantage and this is a skill that comes naturally to these three plains Indians.” This new Terpning image will be printed on textured canvas. This unique and valuable technique replicates the look and feel of a Terpning’s original painting, including canvas texture and brushstrokes.

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Crossing Below The Falls





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Crossing Medicine Lodge Creek





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Crow Camp 1864





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Crow Country



"Crow Country" was a land truly blessed by Akba'tat-di'a (the Maker of Everything). At the height of Crow power, their territory consisted of some of the most stunning landscape in all of North America, extending from the Black Hills of North Dakota across Montana to headwaters of the Yellowstone River in Wyoming. A dynamic combination of buffalo-laden plains, thriving forests, mountain peaks and fertile valleys.

“My goal for this painting was to show a tranquil camp scene in a beautiful setting as a backdrop for a war party leaving to raid an enemy camp and perhaps steal some horses if the opportunity presented itself,” says Howard Terpning. “Normally, warriors heading for enemy camps to steal ponies would travel on foot and then ride the captured ponies back to their own camp, but they usually did what the leader of the war party wanted to do.”

Crow Country was one of the two stars of the recent Heritage Western & California Art Signature Auction in Dallas, TX. The only work commanding a higher price was Terpning’s own "Plunder from Sonora." As stated by Ed Beardsley, Vice President of Fine & Decorative Arts at Heritage, “Not only did we offer some of the most recognizable names in Western art, it was arguably some of their finest work and observant buyers recognized that. It was a standing room only crowd bringing lovers of great Western and California art to Heritage’s world headquarters.” The auction included works of Bierstadt, Russell, Leigh and Fechin.

"Crow Country" is an oversized MasterWork® Fine Art Canvas, a 43" x 28" tribute to a time and place when the people and the land were one.


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Crow Pipe Ceremony





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Crow Pipe Holder





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Curious





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Day's End





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Days Of Peace





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Deeds Of His Father





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Digging In At Sappa Creek





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Dust Of Many Pony Soldiers /The Warrior





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Early Snow



“After spending the summer months on the move or in cooler summer encampments at higher elevations,” says Tom Gilleon, “Plains tribes would often move to some river corridor for their winter encampment. The trees that lined these rivers would help provide protection from the elements as well as firewood for the cold winter months. As it is for us today, deep snow was not the Indian’s best friend. This light covering feels to me like it’s the season’s first.”



Gilleon is the 2009 Jackson Hole Arts Festival’s Featured Artist and has an exhibition at Jackson’s Altamira Fine Art for the month of September. The Jackson Hole Arts Festival encompasses the season’s most prestigious shows and auctions, a noteworthy honor.

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Easy Big Fella



On big roundups that often last many weeks or months on the large ranches of the west, each cowboy must have a number of horses to ride. The horses that are assigned to the cowboy are called his string. There may be ten or more horses assigned to each man. He is responsible to take care of them and no one else can ride them without his permission. All the strings combined form a herd called the remuda (a Spanish word for a herd of horses). About the break of day the remuda is rounded up and run into a rope corral formed by the men and their lariats. Each man selects his mount for the morning ride. They are roped and brought out to the men. In this particular scene, the cowboy has tied up the horses hind leg with a soft cotton rope to insure that the horses pastern will not be burned or cut. Tying the horse in this manner insures that the cowboy will be able to saddle him and get on board before he bucks, if he's inclined to.

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Elk Omelette



This incident happened to Robin O'Brien of Georgia. He was working for the Yellowstone Park Service, packing out on the though fare trail. A large bull elk come around the bend on the same trail, saw the horse and mules and apparently thought they were other elk. He lowered his head, snorted and pawed the earth ready for a fight. Robins animals spooked. Two of the mules, tied head to pack saddle, ran on either side of a tree - breaking the packs - scattering food and supplies - and crashed unto each other, breaking free from Robin and each other. All 3 mules lit out back the way they had come. Quite the rodeo. The elk disappeared fortunately - but Robin spent quite a while gathering up food, supplies and th long gone mules.

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Engaged



The average painting by Nelson Boren embodies a number of the artist’s qualities—fastidious attention to detail, a tender eye for texture and a respect for the hard-working people of the modern West. But what makes Nelson Boren’s paintings unique is his playful composition and the teasing close-ups that invite each viewer to create his or her own story. Engaged is no different. Two dusty, hard-working folks sit beside one another holding hands, perhaps a little excited, as the title suggests, with their new arrangement. But the rest of the story is up to you.

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Family First



A good and dependable horse is more than just a way to get somewhere or do a job. He is a friend, tried and true, and to many people he is more than a friend - he is family. This U.S. Marshall is on a man hunt. He has been hard on the trail for several days. Water has been scarce. Finding a seep in the desert is like finding gold. The marshall makes sure his "family" is taken care of first, as his empty canteen attests.

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