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     Cowboys

     Native Americans

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"She Loves Me...?"



A passel of plucked daisies litter the floor. Could it be they told a poor cowboy what he didn´t want to hear? He’s rounded up more, but most look a tad droopy, almost as if they know they’re bearers of bad news. Still the verdict ain’t in until you decide. Does he stand a chance with her? A Greenwich Workshop fine art giclée presented on watercolor stock with a deckled edge.

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1880S Still Life Of Saddle And Rifle





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5 A.M.





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A Cowboy Named Anne





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A Friendly Game At Rendezvous 183



“Great gatherings of trappers and Indians could go on for three or more weeks, during which they would exchange hides for trade goods to carry them through the winter,” explains Howard Terpning. “This rendezvous takes place at Pierre’s Hole (now known as the Teton Basin), which is identified by the hills in the background. Much of the men’s leisure time was spent playing in games of all sorts, with cards being one of their most popular pastimes. Showing both the gaming participants and their spectators enabled me to do studies of an assortment of characters. Although some of the natives may not have understood the game itself, they were undoubtedly drawn in by its excitement.” Any true Terpning collector will be drawn to this stunning large format MasterWork™ image. Deal yourself into this winning hand before it’s too late!

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A Rough Start





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Abandoned



Originally from Eastern Montana, the Crow Indians ranged far and wide by the 1870s. Parties of warriors would travel as far as the Rockies to raid rival tribes, hunt buffalo or chase off newly arrived settlers. This group of Crow inspects the remains of an unfinished, long-abandoned cabin they have encountered on one such journey. Such an intrusion would have been discovered on their own grounds long ago.

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Ambush 1725 At Lovewell Pond



Artist John Buxton’s new Fine Art Edition depicts the calm before the storm of an American Indian surprise attack on militiamen. Captain John Lovewell of New England, a ranger and renowned scalp hunter, died on May 8, 1725 as he led a third expedition against the Abenaki Indians in an area now known as Fryeburg, Maine. A number of colonial militiamen and Abenaki Native Americans, including a notorious war chief named Paugus, also died in the engagement which marked the end of hostilities between the Abenaki and the white colonists in this part of the colonies.



More than 100 years later, the event was immortalized in a poem The Battle of Lovell's Pond, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, author of Paul Revere's Ride, and The Song of Hiawatha.



One of the verses reads:



The warriors that fought for their country, and bled,

Have sunk to their rest; the damp earth is their bed,

No stone tells the place where their ashes repose,

Nor points out the spot from the graves of their foes.



"I'm a historical artist. I don't claim to be a historian," said Buxton who is known for his painstaking research into every detail. He hired a Maine historian to help him explore the banks of what is now Lake Lovewell in Maine. They canoed the lake and saw the actual sites of Captain Lovewell’s exploits. Buxton noted the steep slope of the bank, the vegetation and fully imagined the scene that eventually took shape on his canvas. The original painting was commissioned by a direct descendant of Captain John Lovewell. Now you, too, can own a piece of this remarkable Colonial New England history.

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Among The Spirits Of The Long-Ago People



You know a painting is special when it’s the piece in an exhibition that the collectors just stand in front of for a long period of time and simply don’t say word. And, they keep coming back to do it again and again. If interrupted, they’ll return to it, intent on having the opportunity to enjoy a great work of art.

And in case we hadn’t picked up on that at the Masters of the American West art show this past February, the phone calls coming in to ask us, “When are you going to release it as a Fine Art Edition?” were certainly another clue that demand would be high for this particular giclée canvas.

The winner of the 2011 Thomas Moran Award for Painting, Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People is a magnificent work. Terpning begins with a simple common premise; the grandeur of nature can be sacred. He relates that emotion not by creating a landscape painting, but by focusing on the reverence these men have for what they see. The petroglyphs show that this is an ancient understanding. These men knew it to be so in their time, just as we do today. Their silence, as they take in the wonder about them, is not unlike that of the collectors we saw view this work for the first time.

“Petroglyphs on rock formations indicate that the visitors are in a spiritual place,” describes Howard Terpning, “a place blessed by the long-ago people. Numerous locations like this exist throughout Montana and Wyoming, sometimes high on a mountain with a spectacular view of Mother Earth. For centuries, Indian people have made the journey to these sacred places to give thanks for their blessings and to pray for success in hunting and in battle. Today, they continue to visit these sacred places as their forebears did, leaving small pieces of trade cloth and handmade objects decorated with beads or feathers as gifts for the gods.”

Among the Spirits of the Long-Ago People is available as a Fine Art Canvas. At 33” x 35” it is an impressive work that will majestically fill any large space. Our carefully crafted giclée canvas will give you the experience of owning this great work of art for significantly less than the price the original captured in February. Also available is a more moderately sized and wonderfully priced Fine Art Giclée Paper. Both editions, truly faithful reproductions of the original, are signed by Howard Terpning and numbered.

Collectors who waited too long to commit to last Fall’s The Legend of Geronimo missed out on what is a beautiful (and now hard-to-come-by) canvas or paper edition. Don’t wait too long and miss out again!

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Another Day Another Dollar





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Anticipation





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Arizona Eagle



Nelson Boren’s Arizona Eagle is a cowboy’s tribute to his native state. From the stars and stripes on his dusty boots to the finely-detailed bald eagles on his spurs, this cowboy is proud to be an Arizonan.

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Army Regulations





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As A Feather On Water





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At A Mountain Man Wedding





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At The Burial Of Gallager And Blind B





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August 8 1780: Engaging The Shawnee Village



This battle took place August 8, 1780 during the Revolutionary War period. The British from Ft. Detroit were supplying the natives to attack the colonists in Kentucky and elsewhere. The British built a stockade fort for the Shawnee at their village, which you can see in the upper right corner of image.
Under the leadership of George Rogers Clark, the men of Kentucky retaliated. They moved north to destroy as many Indians and villages as possible while hoping to advance on Ft. Detroit. There were a few villages and six miles of planted corn along the flatlands of the Mad River just west of today’s Springfield, Ohio. This has been called the Battle of Piqua.
The scene shown in my painting is about mid-battle when Clark’s men had attained a hill to the to the west of the stockade. Their six-pound cannon shelled the fort and a group of natives filed out to face-off against Clark’s men.
13-year-old Tecumseh was to have lived at this village, and is shown holding the dog. George Rogers Clark’s cousin, Joseph Rogers, was killed at this battle. He is depicted as the Caucasian Indian on the right side of the native hut.
The engagement was a success for Clark’s bragade, who destroyed six miles of corn, disabling winter raids on Kentucky because the natives needed to hunt game for food.

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Bear Country



Horses do not like the smell or sight of bears and often become frightened enough to stampede in order to get away from them.

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Before The Little Big Horn



"The boundaries of the Sioux Indian nation defined by the Treaty of 1868 were not respected by pioneers or elements of the Sioux and their Cheyenne and Arapaho allies. So, I wanted a somewhat anxious mood to pervade this image of the great plains as cavalry soldiers and Crow Indian scouts gaze across a beautiful, but troubled landscape."

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Bittin' Up - Rimrock Ranch



At Wyoming’s Rimrock Ranch, cowboys and their horses look much the way they did back in the Wild West of Laramie and Cheyenne. Scouting for portrait models, artist James Bama first met ranch hand Greg Laughen in the summer, when the young man’s hat, shirt and jeans were still crisp and new. At the time, Bama offered to take his picture, but the cowboy didn’t feel right – he thought he looked too much like a city slicker. By December, Laughen’s clothes were broken in enough that he felt ready to be photographed. He was teaching a young buckskin its first lessons in responding to the rein. Shortly, he would lead the horse by its makeshift rope bridle into the corral to prepare him for “bittin’ up,” taking the bit without rearing its head. Patiently, the ranch hand has taught the buckskin to take the saddle and to keep calm when men approach. Now his student is ready for a new lesson in horse sense.

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