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A Christensen Character Cleverly Camouflaged In A



Have you truly discovered all there is to see in one of Bev Doolittle’s camouflage pieces? It’s time to take a closer look again! Recently, Jim reminded us that “believing is seeing” and let on to Bev that there may be something more than initially meets the eye in her popular Woodland Encounter. How did Bev react to Jim’s tribute? With surprise and delight. “Jim’s teased me for years and I should have suspected that someday one of his puffy little guys would take up residence in one of my camouflage paintings!”

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A Confabulation Of Dragons



Artist Scott Gustafson is fascinated by the English words used to describe groups of particular animals, such as, a pride of lions or a pod of whales. But there is also a wisp of snipes, a clutter of spiders and two of his favorites, a skulk of foxes and a parliament of owls. (The latter inspired a recent painting and Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Smallworks™ Canvas of the same name.) “In that vein,” said the artist, “I wondered what a gathering of dragons might be called. Finding no name already given it seemed that a linguistic gauntlet had been thrown my way. Rifling both mind and dictionary I happened to stumble upon a wonderful word; confabulate, whose Webster definition is 1) ‘To talk informally; to chat. 2) To replace fact with fantasy in memory.’ As Thoreau once said, ‘Therewas pasture enough for my imagination’ and A Confabulation of Dragons was born.”

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A Lawyer More Than Adequately Attired In Fine Pri



Christensen´s new print inspires closer examination....this stout attorney is adorned with lots of legal mischief. Just some of the touches: his assistant gives him enough rope to hang himself (or his clients!), he has an ample supply of loopholes sewn onto his coat, he is covered in that infamous fine print we all ignore—and much more. This print comes with its own "notice of Discovery and Inspection" document that reveals all.

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A Man And His Dog



A man and his “dog” enjoy a time-honored relationship in which both parties accept each other’s flaws and peculiarities. The gentleman portrayed here might assert that his waistcoat is properly buttoned, each sock is in place, and the items in his pocket are delicious doggie treats for his canine companion, yet his “pet” would never quibble. Indeed, this “dog” could easily break the tie that binds him to his master—the leash is far from strong—but he chooses to remain by his side. Our “Professor of Imagination,” James C. Christensen, advises us to assess our relationships without getting bogged down in details. “I think we can be happy with our perceptions of ourselves if we can honestly say, ‘Nothing I’m doing is importantly wrong’ ”. . . and if we can say the same of our friends.

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A New Day At The Cinderella Castle





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A New Discovery





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Alices Magical Journey





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All The World's A Stage



Kings, queens, knaves and clowns... your favorite Shakespearean characters come to life! †he Bard and more than 50 of his dramatis personae take a bow in this remarkable tribute to Shakespeare’s entire canon—38 plays, including the obscure Two Noble Kinsmen. With the Old Globe Theatre as backdrop, James assembles an eclectic cast of fictional characters and actors in rehearsal mingling with a few thespians who never tread the boards (but might have flittered above them). You’ll find Romeo proffering a rose to Juliet, who rebuffs the salacious overtures of Henry VIII. Viola of Twelfth Night is in the act of binding her breasts to fill the manly role of Cesario, while beside her other Shakespearean heroines don male apparel to play their virile counterparts— all the more interesting when you consider that in Shakespeare’s day men played all the female roles. Caesar is a self-portrait—an opportunity for the artist to make a statement about backstabbing (he doesn’t like it!) and revel in applause (notice Titus Andronicus giving him a warm hand). All humor aside… James’ prodigious knowledge of Shakespeare manifests in a work offering multiple layers of meaning and countless discoveries. All the World’s a Stage was commissioned by the Utah Shakespearean Festival—winner of this year’s Tony Award for Outstanding Regional Theatre—in celebration of its 40th anniversary. Published from the artist’s original oil painting. Available in both a print and giclée canvas edition. 3000 signed by the artist and consecutively numbered.

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Angel Unobserved



"The veil between us and heaven can be quite thin or, at times, a little thicker. This girl’s eyes are open to experience but, like other teenagers, the things she is most aware of concern herself,” says artist James Christensen. “There’s a veil between who she is now, and the woman she will become, much less a higher power. She’s not conscious of the angel that watches over her,” says James Christensen. “The key to it, though, is that we all have someone keeping an eye on us."

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Angel With Floating Fish



This original etching is 4X4 is framed to 20 1/2" X 25."

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Armoured Essscort



I did this painting shortly out of college (the irony is that I graduated with a degree in ceramic sculpture, not painting). It was originally going to be a simple drawing of a snake with a cat in it's belly, sort of a joke between my brother, his wife, and I. (they had a cat and a snake). As I drew, erased and re-drew, this armoured snake evolved and I knew I had to paint it. It has been one of my favorite pieces over the years.



This painting is about a journey, a journey of life. You know the old adage: "The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first slither" (if you happen to be a snake).

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Balancing Act



Like The Burden of the Responsible Man, this is a very autobiographical piece. I just didn’t know how I could balance another thing in my life, and then, bingo, this idea came into my head. Life is a balance between fun and work, spiritual qualities, education, nutrition … our lives are continuously balancing acts. Of course, some of us make it a little more complex by putting our only balancing foot on the back of a moving turtle. Why are there three clocks in the image? Because we’re always balancing time. There are many specific symbols in the image. Most of them are far from obscure, but the little neat secrets include a king statue, the symbol of the omnipresence of politics and government. The skull is a spring hare skull, with a little label that reads “spring hare – lost race.” It’s a joke, but it also symbolizes mortality. The owl and the pussycat represent marriage, which is a major balancing act. The Latin in the image means “Equilibrium (balance) is to be desired.” In other words, as long as you remain upright, you’re okay. Those are just a few things, but everything here means something. What do they mean to you?

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Bambi's First Year





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Beauty And The Beast





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Beauty And The Beast



Every evening the Beast comes to visit Beauty in her chamber, to talk with her and be near her. Tonight, as she sweetly plucks the harp strings, her mind wanders home to her father and sisters she misses so terribly. He, on the other hand, can think only of her. Every night before he leaves, this longing for her wells up and consumes him and he is compelled to ask, “Beauty, will you marry me?”



And every night her answer is the same: “Even though I have grown to care for you very much, Beast, I do not love you. I am sorry, but no, I cannot marry you.”



He exhales his grief in a deep sigh that echoes like a moaning wind through the palace corridors. Neither of them is aware at this moment that a bond has grown between them. Nor do they know what miracles the love they share will ultimately reveal.



In folkloric circles, the story of "Beauty and the Beast" belongs to a story motif called a Beast Marriage. This happens to be a very common motif and appears in many tales and ballads throughout the world, one of the most famous variations being Grimm's fairytale, "The Frog Prince."



"Since, from the very beginning I knew there was going to be a tapestry in the background of this piece, the only question was what would be the subject matter," said the artist. "Ultimately, it seemed only fitting that the Beast might have chosen for his wall décor an image depicting characters from a story so similar to his own, and from which he surely would have derived much inspiration."

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Benediction



The words coming out of this angel’s mouth are purposely provocative and designed to make you wonder “What does that mean?” It’s Latin, beatus est pisciculus, meaning “Blessed is the little fish.” Floating fish symbolize the magic all around us and they are blessed little things themselves, to bring this magic into our lives. Is the angel blessing the fish or the fish blessing the angel? The fish is a symbol I frequently use and this painting was meant as my “thank-you” for a lot of the magic in my life.

Christensen’s original painting is 36x48 inches. Our Anniversary edition is released in two sizes, a very limited quantity at a major-statement size of 40 x 30, and also at 24 x 18 inches. The blessing of Benediction works beautifully at either size.



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Black Tie Affair





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Butterfly Knight



“You’ve probably heard the phrase ‘excessive force’ — well this knight is the embodiment of excessive preparation,” says artist James C. Christensen. “He has armored himself to the point of immobility and his quarry will almost certainly evade him.”



Fans of the artist will recognize many of his signature traits, however iron-clad, including the floating fish, the charming yet self-important little man and the hilarious detailed flourishes to the costumes right down to the bell lashed to the bird’s leg. Are those chicken feet? Say, those tail feathers look a bit suspicious… Don’t miss the opportunity to hang this delightful warrior in your home.

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Castles In The Sky



Like boys who build their castles from little blocks of wood, And imagine that they are king today of all that´s great and good; We men build our own walls, perhaps of granite stone, And proudly sit within those walls upon our self-made throne. Foolishly we climb our highest tower and look across the land, to see if someone else´s castle upon a higher hill might stand. Then gazing at the flying clouds and sinking sun of day, A memory stirs from deep inside of castles far away; Splendid ones with spires of light and towering walls of gold, with stairs that we have climbed and streets that we have strolled. More glorious than tongue can speak are the sights of a scene thus filled, But the heart cries a familiar, YES!--These castles are real! Tho´ here our home may be palatial, each courtyard with fountained pond, Yet all are but scanty similes of these castles far beyond. And so our mortal homes, be they quaint or be they grand, It matters not at all, for none of these will stand. Granite stone like wooden blocks will tumble down someday, And off we´ll fly into the clouds and there in a castle stay!

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Celeste (Astronomy Faerie)





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